Tag Archives: Iqos

How to be popular

I quote from British American Tobacco’s International Marketing Principles, 2015:

We will not portray smoking as an activity that makes people appear more popular,appealing or successful.

But they seem to have no qualms about portraying the use of their new product with the almost unpronounceable name of ‘glo’ as an activity that makes people appear more popular, appealing or successful.

This is from a twenty-four page booklet about ‘glo’ in Japan. I picked it up from promotional display in the street outside a corner shop selling cigarettes. A young person seeing this – and how can you prevent children and young people from seeing this and similar advertising? – might well want to try it just to appear popular and appealing like the models in the picture. While all of them except one are raising their glasses in a toast to something, three of the models are looking directly at the exception, the young man holding, not a glass of wine, but his ‘glo’ contraption. Also, note the bowl of fruit in the lower part of the picture – healthy food – being associated with the poison you can suck into your lungs with the ‘glo’ thingummy.  The advertising people must have worked really hard on this one!

 So I wrote to BAT through their website asking them the following question:

In your International Marketing Principles you say, ‘We will not portray smoking as an activity that makes people appear more popular,appealing or successful.’ But your promotional leaflet and the website for ‘glo’ in Japan does just this very thing. Do you have different ethical standards and marketing principles in different countries?

I received a polite reply from someone in their External Affairs department in Japan:

Although we don’t have specific International Marketing Principles in place for Tobacco Heating Products yet, please be assured we are applying the spirit of our existing principles to ‘glo’ as well as adhering to all regulations and voluntary codes.

I shall leave it to the reader to judge how far the spirit of BAT’s existing principles applies to to  their ‘glo’ product.

And how about this display in a Tokyo convenience store, conveniently placed at a child’s eye level:Big Tobacco, fearing that sales of cigarettes are going to decline more and more (at least in most developed countries), are rushing to bring out alternative tobacco products with the claim that these are less harmful. Apart from BAT’s ‘glo’, examples are Philip Morris’s IQOs (or iQOS) and Japan Tobacco International’s  ‘Ploom’ – at least you can pronounce the last-mentioned.

The fumes generated by these products still contain poisons, although maybe in smaller amounts compared with ordinary cancer sticks. The user is going to suck the fumes thereof into his or her lungs many times a day for years on end. And for what? To achieve a state of bliss? To see visions of heaven?

Are we non-nicotine users missing something?

Text © Gabriel Symonds

They – Will – Cause – Death!

Dave Dorn is a trustee of the so-called New Nicotine Alliance (astonishingly, a Registered Charity in the UK). He claims that 80% of smokers who have taken up vaping have successfully switched from smoking because of what he calls ‘the pleasure principle’.

The gold necklace-wearing Dave gave a talk at the Global Forum on Nicotine in Warsaw in 2016. This was a ‘multi-stakeholder event [for those] with an interest in nicotine and its uses.’ The purpose of the conference seems to have been to promote e-cigarettes.

This is part of what he said:

The enjoyment that a smoker can have, the pleasure that a smoker can have from something which at the end of the day is not going to kill them. Something that presents less than 5% of the risk of smoking lit tobacco. The pleasure principle [holding up e-cigarette device] is what makes these things work. And this is why the Tobacco Products Directive in the EU, the FDA Deeming Regulations, all of which are concentrated on Quit! Quit! Quit! will fail. They – will – cause – death! They – will – cause earlier death because they do – not – allow for the pleasure principle. And that – for e-cigs – is the most important thing.

Death or pleasure – what a choice!

This is worth looking at in a little more detail. He also said, warming to his pleasurable theme, that some e-cigarettes taste absolutely gorgeous and give him more enjoyment than smoking did. The absolutely gorgeous taste presumably is not experienced through drinking the e-liquid – because it indeed could cause death if you did this – so presumably he must be referring to the taste of the vapourised e-liquid in his mouth as he sucks it into his lungs.

It is difficult to understand how you can perceive a taste in this way but it seems he has been doing this daily since 2009 instead of smoking. If you observe vapers, they suck at frequent if irregular intervals on their devices and a conservative estimate would be at least one hundred times a day. Now, is Mr Dorn saying that the reason he engages in this unnatural practice is because he gets pleasure from it? Does vaping produce in him a sense of bliss, a kind of ecstatic or orgasmic state so wonderful that he feels compelled to do it a hundred times or more every day for years on end?

In any case, he’s muddled about the idea of the pleasure principle. This theory was first propounded by Sigmund Freud, and he meant it as the instinct to obtain pleasure and avoid pain, particularly in babies and young children who seek immediate gratification of hunger and thirst. As the child matures this is tempered by the reality principle: the need to defer gratification and accept pain, if necessary. So Dorny means, not the pleasure principle, but merely pleasure.

Is pleasure in this context an illusion? And does it matter if it is? One patient said to me: ‘Maybe the pleasure of smoking is an illusion, but it’s a very nice illusion!’ But if smokers and vapers could understand why their perceived pleasure is illusory – and it’s easy enough for them to demonstrate this to themselves – would they be happy to carry on poisoning themselves for years on end?

My publisher, in the course of editing my book Smoking is a Psychological Problem, made the interesting observation that some people claim to enjoy whipping themselves, so who am I to say they’re wrong?

This is an valid point. I would respond that there is nothing wrong with self-flagellation if that is what adults wish to do. It may be harmful – the skin could be broken and infection set in – but the number of people involved is miniscule. I suppose there is a market for whips, but unlike smoking, it is not a multi-billion dollar enterprise resulting in seven million deaths per year worldwide.

Therefore, if vaping is (almost) harmless and vapers are deluded that it’s pleasurable why not just let them pretend to enjoy themselves?

Pleasure is also hyped by the purveyors of other alternative ways of gratifying the need for nicotine, such as with the new product called IQOS. I picked up a partially used pack of these things lying on the ground. It contained two ‘HeatSticks’. They looked like thin short cigarettes including a filter. The pack that I found was designated ‘Mint’ and indeed the things did smell like a combination of mint and tobacco. But it also said on the pack: ‘Tobacco enjoyment with less smell and no ash.’ So that’s all right then.

Well, it’s not all right. It’s very far from all right. The gloss on the IQOS packet ‘Tobacco enjoyment’ is false. Here’s why. There’s nothing pleasant or enjoyable about inhaling tobacco fumes. What happens is that when the nicotine in the fumes reaches the brain, the user is in a drugged state. Shortly thereafter, as the nicotine level starts to fall, he or she suffers (or is on the point of suffering) mildly unpleasant symptoms of drug withdrawal. It is the relief of these symptoms by the next dose of nicotine that provides the illusion of transient pleasure. Let poor Dave Dorn try a flavoured but nicotine-free vape liquid to experience his absolutely gorgeous taste and see for how long he wants to keep doing it.

Apart from that, take one hundred sucks of an e-cigarette or an IQOS gadget every day for twenty years and then let’s see what affect it has on your health.

Text © Gabriel Symonds

How to smoke without smoking!

Here is an interesting piece of news reported in the online Health News (Reuters Health) on  26 May 2017.

The headline is the alarming statement: ‘Heat-not-burn cigarettes still release cancer-causing chemicals.’ Shock, horror.

This is according to an investigation by Dr Reto Auer and colleagues of the University of Bern, Switzerland.

The heat-not-burn type of cigarette has recently been put out by tobacco giant Philip Morris. It has the unpronounceable name of IQOS that some wag has suggested may stand for ‘I quit ordinary smoking’.

If this is what it is supposed to mean it is misleading in the same way that e-cigarettes are misleadingly touted as a way to stop smoking. In both cases what it boils down to is that the user can get his or her nicotine fixes by a different and possibly safer way than through ordinary cancer sticks – and in many cases will carry on using the new gadget, instead of or in addition to smoking, indefinitely. Therefore, it would be clearer, as well as more honest, if IQOS and similar contraptions were promoted, not as a way to stop smoking, but as a way to continue smoking without the smoke.

The Swiss study found that the heat-not-burn devices produced 84% of the nicotine found in traditional cigarettes and they released chemicals linked to cancer including carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons! Not only that, but they also found they ‘released some of these chemicals in much higher concentrations that conventional cigarettes.’ Shock, horror again. And as if even that was not enough, they pointed out the unsurprising fact that ‘there is no safe minimum (sic) limit for some of the chemicals  in heat-not-burn cigarette smoke…and some of these chemicals may contribute to the high mortality rate of smokers.’

So IQOS is not safe. We might have guessed as much. Anyway, thank you, Dr Auer, and a very good morning to you.

But wait! He’s not content with merely underlining the obvious. Now he says, ‘We need more studies to find out about the health consequences of smoking heat-not-burn cigarettes…[and whether they] are safer for users or bystanders.’ Then comes the punch-line: ‘While more studies are needed to determine the long-term health effects of heat-not-burn cigarettes, their use should be restricted until more is known about them.’

What is he expecting to discover with more studies? Yet more ways in which IQOS is not safe? Or perhaps that IQOS is, after all, completely safe? And would Dr Auer be so good as to tell us in the meantime how and to whom the use of IQOS should be restricted.

Furthermore, for nicotine users to swap one way of taking the poison nicotine into their bodies for another, allegedly safer, way (assuming they switch completely) implies nicotine use is acceptable or necessary in some circumstances. And what circumstances might those be?

We have an attempt at an answer to this question in a recent issue of the online Vaping Post which clearly shows the confusion about why some people feel a need to keep putting the poison nicotine into their bodies:

Most smokers don’t really want to quit. They say they do when someone with a clipboard asks them, but they don’t really mean it. The fact is most smokers keep smoking because they enjoy it.

This is correct except for the last two words which should be replaced with: are addicted to nicotine.

A little open-minded discussion with smokers will soon reveal that they don’t in fact enjoy smoking. The only reason they feel a need to keep putting nicotine into their bodies by one means or another is because they believe they are unable to stop.

For any kind of nicotine use to be promoted, albeit indirectly, as enjoyable is itself underhand and even dishonest: it’s a false promise.

Here’s a random selection of quotations from e-cigarette-selling websites:

We vape for life: to both promote life and to vape as a lifestyle change for the betterment of society. We’re out to change the world and save lives by making vaping more fun…

Vaping has taken the world by storm in popularity, and the options and accessories have become even more fun and varied.

Our premium quality 100% USA-made e-liquids are offered in a large variety of flavors and are customizable for our customers’ enjoyment.

The NJOY Daily is our newest electronic cigarette that delivers an authentic, satisfying experience. New design, new technology, a whole new reason to NJOY yourself.

Why should current nicotine addicts be encouraged to change from a dangerous way of using nicotine to an allegedly less dangerous way? Why use nicotine at all? Contrary to what almost everybody seems to believe, getting free from nicotine addiction is easy – if you go about it in the right way.

Text © Gabriel Symonds

Vaping Forever!

Here is a fantastic piece of news about an undercover investigation by the Royal Society of Public Health, reported in April 2017. They found that nine out of ten retailers of e-cigarettes ‘are turning a blind eye to their use by non-smokers, and effectively pushing them as a lifestyle product.’ Very wicked!

What are vape shop staff supposed to do when a customer comes in who wants to buy this type of nicotine delivery device? Ask the customer to prove he or she is a smoker? Or say, ‘I’m sorry, I can’t sell e-cigarettes as a lifestyle product – you’ll have to become a smoker first, so when you’ve got a nice smoker’s cough and nicotine-stained fingers come back and I’ll sell you e-cigarettes to help you stop smoking!’?

Shops exist to sell their goods. Quite rightly there are age-related restrictions on alcohol and tobacco, but it’s one thing to ask a potential customer to prove his or her age and quite another to prove that they’re smokers. And why should the proprietors of vape shops be put in this invidious position? The Independent British Vape Trade Association, as it’s known, tries a bit of awkward fence sitting in its Code of Conduct, including the admonition, ‘Never knowingly market to anyone who is not a current or former smoker, or a current vaper.’ Anyone can say they are a former smoker, and I don’t blame them for casting the net a bit wide.

The government should make up its mind about how e-cigarettes and other nicotine delivery devices, and indeed ordinary cigarettes, should be regulated.

If e-cigarettes are supposed to be used only by smokers as an aid to quitting then they’ll have to be sold under licence or with a doctor’s prescription. But how long will this be for? Presumably, as long as it’s deemed necessary for the smoker to be cured of the desire to smoke cigarettes. And how long will that be?

The problem is in the concept itself of regulation of e-cigarettes. Regulation implies that nicotine use by some people under some circumstances is legitimate or appropriate. For example, e-cigarettes should be allowed to be sold to adult smokers as an aid to smoking cessation. But before starting to deal with the almost impossible practical problems of restricting sales to this group, one fact needs to be understood: the only reason people use nicotine at all is because of their perceived inability to stop.

I experienced an example of this the other day when I had occasion to ride in a taxi in Tokyo. It was raining and I hailed a taxi stopped at traffic lights. All the windows were open in spite of the rain. I got into the taxi and then realised why this was – there was a strong smell of tobacco. Smoking is not permitted in taxis but the driver explained: the previous passenger (or ‘honourable guest’ in the Japanese language) who had just got out, had been using a new nicotine delivery device with the unpronounceable name of ‘Iqos’ which has just been released in Japan.

This contraption, according to its promotional site, is ‘a smokeless cigarette that…uses real tobacco refills, but instead of burning it to produce hazardous smoke and tar, it heats it to produce tobacco-flavored vapor.’ So that’s all right then.

Incidentally, I have never understood how tobacco smoke or a vapour has a taste but it certainly has a smell – or rather, I should say, it stinks. As it was raining I resisted my impulse to get straight out of the taxi, and the stink gradually dissipated. Clearly, legislation on smoking hasn’t yet caught up with modern marketing developments.

There is already enough trouble with cigarettes. We don’t need new nicotine delivery devices. It is misleading that e-cigarettes or ‘heat-not-burn’ tobacco products such as Iqos should be promoted as ways to stop smoking: they are merely new – and potentially hugely profitable – ways of changing one way of feeding a smoker’s nicotine addiction for another.

Text © Gabriel Symonds