Tag Archives: Louise Ross

Oyez! Oyez! Learn to love your lungs!

The Nursing Times (13 November 2017) brings us news of a great way to raise awareness of lung cancer for the citizens of the historic city of Leicester in England.

Specialist nurses will run a stall at a shopping centre where they ‘will be promoting e-cigarettes to the public…as part of efforts to boost smoking cessation.’

One of these highly skilled nurses, Sharon Savory, says: ‘We want to show the public what to look for, who (sic) to see and to learn to love their lungs.’

The key message, we are informed, is that ‘using e-cigarettes are (sic) a “great way” to reduce the harm caused by smoking tobacco.’

Then there’s the cheerful news that on the appointed day, ‘Everyone is invited to take a break from their shopping to learn about the early signs and symptom recognition of lung cancer.’

We also hear from the well known Leicester e-cigarette enthusiast, Louise Ross: ‘We know that vaping is at least 95% safer than smoking, and that people who switch to vaping do very well with their quit attempt.’ I have written about this down-to-earth lady before: http://nicotinemonkey.com/?p=1620

The advice given by Ms Savory, bless her cotton socks, is somewhat restricted. Why should you learn to love just your lungs? What about the rest of your anatomy? The marvel of the human body is that, in health, everything works in perfect harmony with everything else. And smoking, though it obviously affects the lungs, also has widespread harmful effects on the blood, heart, brain, stomach and indeed every organ and system of the body.

What she says is just a slogan, of course, but it would be a better slogan, surely, if the intention is to discourage smoking, if it was something like: ‘Love your life’, ‘Respect your body’ or ‘Your body is the temple of God. Don’t desecrate it by smoking.’

Apart from this, there’s something unseemly about nurses trying to promote e-cigarettes. To start with, it’s incorrect to say ‘we know vaping is at least 95% safer than smoking’. Nobody can say they know this; it’s merely an unproven assertion.

The specialist nurses should be more aware than most people that to inhale e-cigarette vapour many times daily for years on end, as vapers typically do, could be a disaster; we just don’t know what the long term effects will be, and can’t know, until probably another twenty years.

And to say ‘people who switch to vaping do very well with their quit attempt’ is paternalistic and meaningless.

By all means let nurses and anyone else so inclined try to boost smoking cessation. But why do they think the best way to do this is to encourage the use of e-cigarettes? Are other methods no good? Or, if they really believe in this defeatist position, at least let them be open about what it is they’re offering.

What they will be saying at their shopping centre stall to the smoking public on the appointed day, although they appear to be unaware of it, in effect is this:

Oyez! Oyez! All persons having business with smoking come hither. Smoking puts you at serious risk for getting the horrible disease of lung cancer. If you stop smoking you will greatly reduce this risk. You need to understand that the only reason you smoke is because you are addicted to the nicotine in tobacco. If you feel you cannot do the obvious sensible thing and quit smoking forthwith, however, you might consider an alternative way of continuing to be addicted to nicotine that is, we hope, safer than smoking, namely, using e-cigarettes.

There’s a further unfortunate aspect to Ms Savory’s words: it’s reminiscent of the advertisement for ‘LeoLites’ e-cigarettes (illustrated), which was banned in Britain in 2014 because it was deemed to imply that e-cigarettes were beneficial to the users’ health.

Before our specialist nurses get carried away by their eagerness to encourage these new drug delivery devices, apart from the unknown risks of using e-cigarettes, perhaps they should consider whether anyone needs to be in a drugged state with nicotine at all?

Text © Gabriel Symonds

Stopping Smoking through Vulgarity

‘Smokefree’ is a catchy neologism used by the NHS Smokefree campaign. It’s supported by Public Health England which is part of the UK government’s Department of Health. So it’s quite kosher.

But what’s this? The Leicester City Stop Smoking Service at a quick glance looks similar:

As we can see, it offers not just any old licensed products to assist your efforts to become smokefree, but traditional licensed products! Well, bless their cotton socks. The manager, Louise Ross, comments: ‘Every time I see someone vaping I think: that’s another person NOT smoking a cigarette.’

And if the gung-ho Ms Ross were to observe a member of the public going about their business who is neither smoking nor vaping, would she think: ‘That’s another person NOT smoking a cigarette’? It seems to her the normal state of non-smoking is regarded as remarkable and a matter for congratulations.

In either event she seems to have a lot to be pleased about. How does she do it? With vulgarity. I promise I am not making this up. On the redoubtable Leicester City Stop Smoking Service website you soon come across a YouTube video of which the first written words, I blush to tell you, are: ‘Have you got the balls to stop smoking?’ It’s narrated by Gerry Taggart who, you will be glad to know, is a ‘Former Northern Island and Leicester City Defender’ – and I hasten to add he speaks like the gentleman he is throughout the short film. However, there is even a page labelled ‘Balls to stop’. It seems this website caters only to men. Incidentally, Gerry Taggart tells us he just woke up one day and decided he didn’t want to smoke any more – and he hasn’t. Once he put his mind to it, it was easy – and he didn’t need e-cigarettes.

Leaving aside for the moment the question of why you should need any sort of product to stop smoking, let us look at this stop smoking service’s wording in a little more detail:

We offer all the traditional licensed products (patches, mouth-spray, inhalators, Champix and many more), and advisors are skilled in helping people choose the right product for them.

Presumably the products don’t include e-cigarettes because these are not licensed for smoking cessation.

But they are included – very much so. The service emphasizes that it’s ‘ecig friendly’. That’s rather obvious: almost every page of the website shows pictures of e-cigarettes or contains articles about vaping.

If you want to stop smoking, or as one might say, be smoke-free, this conjures up a picture of giving up smoking and thereafter carrying on with your life without the need to poison yourself all the time by sucking tobacco smoke into your lungs.

But with these sorts of stop smoking services it must be rather disappointing for potential clients. The message is that in order to return to the normal state of being a non-smoker, they will instead of smoking be encouraged to put relatively pure nicotine into their bodies by other means and this could go on indefinitely. Or they may be offered a chemical drug to take for weeks or months. Or maybe clients will be offered nicotine products and chemical drugs.

On the other hand, rather than using a product to stop smoking, one could approach it in a different way that might be expressed by paraphrasing Ms Ross: ‘Every time I see someone vaping I think: that’s another person in the thrall of NICOTINE ADDICTION!’

Surely, someone who wants to stop smoking wishes to be free of nicotine in any shape or form. In this case, is so-called nicotine replacement the best that can be offered, or is it just second best? Why should anyone have to settle for second best? The fact that smoking substitutes are offered at all merely reinforces the fear that smokers already suffer: the prospect of never smoking again is almost too much to contemplate.

You don’t need ‘products’, let along nicotine-containing ones, to stop smoking. You just need to understand why you’re in such a pickle in the first place. Or, as shown by Gerry Taggart, you need a different mind-set. Then quitting is easy.

Text © Gabriel Symonds