Tag Archives: Philip Morris

How not to solve the smoking problem

There’s no shortage of ideas, particularly from people who appear to have no experience in actually treating smokers, about how to solve the smoking problem.

For example, let’s take a look at an article in the online Dorset Echo of 29 September 2017 written by a trainee reporter.

To set the mood there are two large illustrations: ‘A Generic (sic) Photo (sic) of someone smoking a cigarette’ and an ‘Undated file photo of a cigarette stubbed out in an ashtray’. How very interesting!

The piece quotes a report in which an unnamed expert says, ‘There’s never been a better time to stop smoking’. So last month wasn’t a good time but today is a good time? The best time to stop smoking is right now. Perhaps the expert means that these days it’s easier to quit because of all the support that’s supposed to be available. But even this doesn’t make sense. Every smoker desirous of quitting – and this very phrase begs the question that smokers actually want to quit – has himself or herself ultimately to confront the reality of never smoking again.

Then we’re told, ‘For the first time, any smoker – no matter their background or job, sex, age or where they live – has virtually the same chance of quitting successfully as the next person.’

How marvellous! But who is this mysterious next person? And what is meant by ‘the same chance of quitting’? Is quitting a matter of chance?

This is followed by the information that ‘The report coincides with the launch of Stoptober quit smoking challenge, which has inspired over one and a half million quit attempts since 2012.’

Allow me to ask, what’s the good of a quit attempt, and what does it mean anyway? You either smoke or you don’t. The idea of a quit attempt is meaningless. It’s a fantasy that colludes with smokers to feel less bad about their nicotine addiction: they’re trying to stop – while they merrily carry on smoking – so that’s all right then.

Finally, we get the curious news that ‘E-cigarettes are now the most popular way to quit in the country with half of all those taking part in Stoptober last year using an e-cigarette. The evidence is clear – vaping is at least 95 per cent less harmful than smoking – a fraction of the risk.’

Unfortunately, our trainee is poorly informed. There’s no evidence that vaping is at least 95 per cent less harmful than smoking; this was merely the opinion of a group of people with no recognised expertise in what is called tobacco control and was based on arbitrary, theoretical criteria. The figure was released at the end of a weekend conference in London in 2014 and has been heavily criticised in the medical literature, not least because of potential conflicts of interest of some of the participants. More details can be found in my blog at http://nicotinemonkey.com/?p=1267

The reality is that no one knows what the effect will be of sucking into your lungs e-cigarette vapour many times a day for years on end. But common sense tells you it won’t do you any good.

Another example is a press release (2 October 2017) about an Australian billionaire, Andrew Forrest, who is rather upset, as well he might be, that his government is not doing enough to deal with the smoking problem and is preparing to launch a campaign to raise the legal smoking age from 18 to 21.

This is based on the idea that since most smokers start in their teens or younger, if they can refrain or be prevented from smoking until they reach 21, fewer will start.

Professor Sanchia Aranda of Cancer Council Australia speaks approvingly of this idea, noting that the smoking rate among 14 to 18-year-olds is at an all-time low, with 80 per cent of young Australians in that age group having never smoked.

What the good professor doesn’t seem to understand is that the problem is not with the 80 per cent of young Australians who’ve never smoked, but with the 20 per cent who have tried smoking or currently do smoke, in spite of being below the legal age.

Any enterprising youngster will always find ways to obtain cigarettes if he or she wishes to. The problem is not the age at which cigarettes may legally be purchased, but the fact that they are available at all. And in the somewhat unlikely event that suddenly all young Australians will become models of compliance with all rules and regulations, it will take decades – assuming such an ill-conceived plan works at all – until a smoke-free generation appears.

Mr Forrest, more sensibly if still impracticably, also wants to sue tobacco companies for the damage their poisonous products cause. Predictably, a spokesman for the tobacco giant Philip Morris, alarmed at this idea, patronisingly says, ‘Instead of promoting costly litigation, we would encourage Mr Forrest to focus his attention on product developments that have the potential to substantially reduce the harms associated with smoking.’

Why should Mr Forrest collude with the likes of Philip Morris? The problem is not the lack of what are cynically called ‘potential reduced risk products’, but the fact that tobacco is available at all, to anyone of whatever age.

If Mr Forrest nonetheless really wants to make an impact on the smoking problem, perhaps he would consider using some of his wealth to promote the abolition of cigarette sales in Australia.

Text © Gabriel Symonds

He who sups with Philip Morris should have a long spoon!

The words that came to me as I read this piece in today’s Financial Times were disingenuous, self-serving, cynical and the like.

Philip Morris International has pledged up to $1bn over the next 12 years to an arm’s-length foundation that will fund scientific research designed to eliminate the use of smoked tobacco around the globe.

[Philp Morris]…last week registered the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World as a US charitable organisation, with the stated aim of making grants on ‘how to best achieve a smoke-free world and advance the field of tobacco harm reduction’.

How generous of them! That’s what we need – scientific research (of course they wouldn’t do unscientific research, would they) to eliminate the use of smoked tobacco! And what a noble cause: to ‘advance the field of tobacco harm reduction’!

Then we have the two-faced André Calantzopoulos, chief executive of Philip Morris Ineternational, telling the Financial Times (emphasis added of weasel words and clichés):

Our efforts are squarely focused on ultimately replacing cigarettes with smoke-free products, by offering the millions of men and women who continue to smoke a better alternative. We are standing at the cusp of a true revolution and look forward to the foundation’s objective review of our efforts and efforts of others.

Allow me to re-write this in plain English, saying what I think he really means:

For the millions of people who are addicted to the nicotine in our cigarettes and who therefore find they are unable to quit, we offer an alternative, iQOS, which may (or may not) be a safer way of inhaling tobacco fumes. If everyone were eventually to switch from cigarettes to iQOS our profits would be sustained or may even increase and into the bargain we can present ourselves as a public health champion! (The $1bn is, of course, a drop in the ocean for us.)

Well, I can tell them exactly what they need to do to achieve a smoke-free world and advance the field of tobacco harm reduction – and I won’t charge anything like $1bn for my services. In fact I’ll advise them for free. This is what they need to do, and should do in a much shorter time span than the next twelve years: stop making cigarettes. That will achieve, as least as far as Philip Morris are concerned, the first aim of eliminating the use of smoked tobacco. As for the second aim, that of advancing the field, as they put it, my suggestion will go a long way to achieving that too.

But, of course, what they really want to do, while they keeping merrily on making and selling ordinary cancer sticks, is to plug for all they’re worth their new product with the unpronounceable name of iQOS. For those of my readers who are unfamiliar with what this is, here is a picture of an advertising placard for it, conveniently placed at a child’s eye level in my local branch of Seven-Eleven.

iQOS (or should that be iQOSs?) look like little cigarettes. They are made of tobacco which is heated (not burnt), with the resultant poisonous fumes being inhaled into the lungs. Philip Morris claims this is potentially less harmful than inhaling cigarette smoke – so that’s all right then. And, Bingo! – the field of tobacco harm reduction is advanced!

The misleadingly named Foundation for a Smoke-free World is curiously described as ‘arm’s length’, by which I suppose mean independent. But will it be?

Our old friend Professor Linda Bauld (http://nicotinemonkey.com/?p=1823), however misguided her views on the use of e-cigarettes in pregnancy may be, at least strikes a note of scepticism about this set-up:

I’m very cautiousI’d prefer research completely independent from industry.

Quite right.

Why do I say the Foundation is misleadingly named? Because what they envisage is a world where, even if smoking disappears, millions of people will still continue in the thrall of nicotine addiction.

Text and photo © Gabriel Symonds

Philip Morris tortures animals

Yesterday

Today

The tobacco giant, Philip Morris International (PMI), has applied to the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) to market what they call ‘modified risk tobacco products’ (MRTP), in particular, their heated tobacco contraption with the unpronounceable name of IQOS, or iQOS.

They start by putting their cards on the table: ‘PMI recognizes that cigarettes are a dangerous product.’ Then why don’t they stop making them?

In the application they submit evidence to support their claim that if smokers switch completely (the word ‘completely’ is redundant) to iQOS they ‘can reduce the risks of tobacco-related diseases.’

But now the Oh-so-honest American global cigarette and tobacco company, PMI, makes a devastating admission:

It is well known that the best way to avoid the harms of smoking is never to start, and for smokers, the best way to reduce the harms of smoking and the risk of tobacco-related disease is to quit. (Emphasis added.)

Note how they say that if you want to avoid the harms of smoking you should never start, which is true indeed, but if you are already a smoker and you quit, then you can only reduce the harms to which you have been exposed, not avoid them.

This is because, even if you stop smoking, the damage may already have been done. Certainly the risk of getting cancer will decline steeply as a few years go by after quitting but, alas, the risk will not go down to what it would have been if someone had never smoked.

Just to rub it in, they go on: ‘Cigarette smoking [accounts in America] for more than 480,000 smoking-related deaths every year, and more than 16 million Americans live with a smoking-related disease.’

So what does PMI do in the light of these shocking revelations?

They present themselves as the good guys:

PMI…has recently announced its goal to lead a full-scale effort to ensure that MRTPs ultimately replace cigarettes. Indeed, PMI envisions a smoke-free world where a broad range of MRTPs fully satisfies the continuing consumer demand for tobacco and nicotine products.

So PMI wants to be a public health champion, envisioning a smoke-free world where products such as iQOS will ultimately replace cigarettes. Note the assumption that there will always be – happily for PMI and its shareholders – a ‘continuing consumer demand for tobacco and nicotine products’. How about envisioning a nicotine addiction-free world?

All this, however, is merely a prelude to what I want to say in today’s post.

PMI, in their great humanitarian efforts to develop tobacco products that they hope will be  less harmful than cigarettes, have applied to the FDA for a licence to market their iQOS product. And what evidence do they present in favour of their application?

They subjected rats and mice to cruel experiments in which they were forced to breath iQOS fumes for six hours a day, five days a week for months on end. The fumes were either pumped into the boxes where the animals were confined, or in ‘nose only’ tests, they were held immobile in a kind of funnel with their noses sticking out of the end to be exposed directly to the fumes. The reason for this refinement was to avoid messing up the experiment by the animals ingesting more of the poison in the fumes by licking their fur as they would do if the whole body was exposed. The animals were then then killed and their noses, throats and lungs examined to see how much damage had been inflicted. Very little damage. Therefore iQOS is (relatively) safe for humans, they say.

Apart from the fact that there is no scientific basis for assuming that what happens or doesn’t happen in experiments on rodents has any relevance for humans, these abhorrent tests are manifestly cruel, causing pain and distress to these animals.

This research is reminiscent of the ‘smoking Beagles’ scandal in Britain in 1975 when an undercover investigation led to the exposure of experiments being done on Beagle dogs in a futile attempt to develop a ‘safer’ cigarette. The work was done by Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI). The dogs were restrained and forced to breath, by a face mask, the smoke from up to thirty cigarettes a day for as long as three years. The subsequent public outcry led to animal experiments for tobacco products being banned in Britain and Europe – but not in America.

It’s not as if the experimenters were using animals in the hope of finding a cure for cancer. Their object was to find a new way, acceptable to the FDA, of keeping people hooked on nicotine and their profits healthy to make up for the decline in cigarette sales.

Text © Gabriel Symonds